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All rights reserved. Facebook Twitter YouTube. Will we reach next year? White Zombie Director: Victor Halperin. Where else could we begin? Lugosi, predictably, is the one bright spot, but you had to start somewhere. And of course, the film also inspired a certain musical project from Rob Zombie.

It gets the 50 spot of honor almost solely for historical significance. It will be extremely trashy. It will be violent. It will have no boundaries and no sense of good taste. Watching a Troma movie is about embracing the gore, scatological humor and low-production values and simply appreciating some mindless storytelling. Poultrygeist , as a result, is just minutes of bloody, gory, raunchy insanity. Shock Waves Director: Ken Wiederhorn. There have been, by my amateur count, at least 16 Nazi zombie movies since this point—certainly more than one might realize—which makes this one fairly significant at least for combining the portmanteau of great film villains first.

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Our Zombies Are Different

Films like the Dead Snow series ultimately owe it all to Shock Waves. Bookwalter to direct the low-budget zombie epic of his dreams. What you have in The Dead Next Door , then, is something unique even for this genre: A grainy, low-budget zombie action-drama, featuring a combination of cringe-inducing amateur acting performances and touches of unexpected professionalism, all at once. Colin Director: Marc Price. And so yes, Colin does earn itself some points for originality, even though its extreme micro-budget and execution are often hindrances.

Marc Price set out to direct a zombie flick for essentially nothing in , and he did so by casting it entirely from the perspective of one zombie, the titular Colin, who gets wounded by his zombie roommate before reanimating. Venturing out into the world newly born as one of the undead, he ambles down streets and develops the requisite taste for human flesh. Still, Colin actually does pull off a nice little arc for the character that ends by giving more meaning to how he became a zombie in the first place.

The problem: World War Z is one of the worst adaptations of great source material that the horror genre has ever seen. This is a film where a zombie wearing a wedding dress pops out of a washing machine to strangle a housewife—just go with it. The film follows some quite dumb and impulsive vacationers who end up in the abandoned ruins of the evil Templar monastery, awakening the blind dead, who can locate you by hearing your heartbeat.

It also features a delightfully unexpected ending involving the slaughter of an entire train of innocent people.

Many of them are terrible, but occasionally you do get one like Aaah! When we see things from the perspective of human characters, the film is black-and-white, and the zombies are lumbering and uncoordinated. It gets a decent amount of mileage and laughs out of a decidedly indie budget. Zeder , Director: Pupi Avati. People who are casually acquainted with Italian horror cinema tend to know the greats—Lucio Fulci, Dario Argento, etc. Versus Director: Ryuhei Kitamura.

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Deadgirl Director: Marcel Sarmiento. The s was a decade of taboos falling, but zombie sex is still probably a bit much for many audiences. You have to give it to the writers—no one had really drawn up an entire film about the sexuality of the undead before this. Like it or hate it, any and every instance of zombie sex in the future will always be compared to Deadgirl in some way. The World. The bevy of teachers run afoul of a swarm of pint-sized zombies, students who have been turned into the undead by a food-borne virus in their cafeteria chicken nuggets.

The jokes, then, do tend to boil down to the unusual nature of seeing children as the aggressors and adults running for their lives, or hacking their way through a crowd of zombies who come up to their navels. One thing Cooties does right—its zombies retain a degree of their own innate personalities, which means they on some level still act like kids.

Dead Snow Director: Tommy Wirkola. The first Dead Snow , though no masterwork, is the better film because it at least partially tries to hit the horror audience instead of abandoning it for full-on horror-comedy camp. A group of students camp out in a remote, snowy cabin in Norway and unwittingly revive a regiment of Nazi zombies by appropriating their Nazi gold—pretty standard stuff for the genre.

The attempts at humor and characterization are so-so, but the FX and action work are top-notch for an indie feature, with great costuming for the zombies and lots of explosive bloodletting, especially as it builds to a ridiculous conclusion.

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Nightmare City Director: Umberto Lenzi. If you love ludicrous foreign horror cinema, and especially batshit crazy Italian zombie movies, then Nightmare City is like the holy grail of your subgenre. Because this movie is insane. And oh, how they kill! These zombies are armed to the teeth with knives, axes, even machineguns.

I repeat: This movie features machinegun-firing zombies, priestly zombies, doctor zombies and even zombies that are implied to have somehow flown and landed a large military plane on their own. Add to that a delightfully wacky English dubbing, full of awkward pauses, strange voices and philosophical ramblings, and you have the birth of a camp classic on your hands.

Slither Director: James Gunn. As in Night of the Creeps , the action revolves around a sort of alien parasite that arrives on Earth and unleashes a horde of parasitic slugs that turn the infected into what are essentially zombies. Equal parts funny, gory, and very, very slimy, Slither never strives to be much more than sleazy entertainment.

It knows its place and plays its role very well. The U.

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The zombies, however, look great, and the restored copy on horror streaming service Shudder right now is a wonderfully high-quality version of the film in particular. These are beliefs still accepted on some level in various communities today, but the film itself is far from grounded, and ventures into a rather outlandish caricature of voodoo beliefs.

What is it about zombie films that compel small-time filmmakers to dream big? People who are casually acquainted with Italian horror cinema tend to know the greats—Lucio Fulci, Dario Argento, etc. Versus Director: Ryuhei Kitamura. Deadgirl Director: Marcel Sarmiento. The s was a decade of taboos falling, but zombie sex is still probably a bit much for many audiences. You have to give it to the writers—no one had really drawn up an entire film about the sexuality of the undead before this. Like it or hate it, any and every instance of zombie sex in the future will always be compared to Deadgirl in some way.